Tag Archives: First50Yrs

Trust, Providence, Pilgrim, Indians, The American Dream and The Transformation of Consciousness

Trust, Providence, Pilgrims, Indians, The American Dream
and
The Transformation of Consciousness

It’s up to US

Talks and Interviews
2014

Good Newes Cover Slide 2

Highland Institute City Club Boulder, Colorado
“Good News About the First Thanksgiving” YouTube
Power Point
November 25, 2014

Expanding Awareness Radio WZBC Boston. Three Interviews YouTube
The Trust Frequency, First Thanksgiving, First Fifty Years and Indigenous Cosmology
2014

Letter to the Editor
Old Colony Memorial Newspaper, Plymouth MA

“Thanksgiving: Past and Present”
A Time to Celebrate and a Time to Mourn
November 25, 2014

Dana Hall School, Wellesley, MA
“Trust, Providence, Pilgrims, Indians and the American Dream” YouTube
A talk by Connie Baxter Marlow
Written Talk
June 2014

Pilgrims and Indians: Ten Common Misbeliefs

Educational Materials

Highlights

  • The pivotal role of the Indians and the Pilgrims in the evolution of democracy and the American mind and spirit.
  • The widely-believed misinformation and misconceptions concerning the relationship between the Pilgrims and the Indians.
  • The resulting blame, shame, anger and guilt that has America morally paralyzed.
  • The inspiring, forgotten, inter-cultural friendship that sits at the founding of the United States – an exception to the human condition then and now.
  • The spiritual alignment of the Mayflower Pilgrims and the Indians they lived amongst.

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You are doing work no-one else has the insight,
perseverance and courage to undertake.
Easan K. Author and William Brewster, Pilgrim Elder Descendant.

The outcome level of our project depends upon the financial support
of those who desire to see the higher perspective on
America’s Origin Story brought to the table.

Donate Here:
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For a tax-deductible donation our fiscal sponsor is:
Native American Olympic Team Foundation
Contact us for details.

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First 50 Years and Consciousness Transformation

Good Newes Cover Slide

Highland Institute City Club – Luncheon Presentation
Boulder, Colorado    November 25, 2014

Click here to watch the talk on YouTube
“Good News About the First Thanksgiving”
Power Point

Andrew Cameron Bailey and Connie Baxter Marlow, Mayflower Descendant, present their discoveries from over a decade of research into the events leading up to and following the harvest celebration in the fall of 1621 now know as The First Thanksgiving and its role in the transformation of consciousness.

Democracy, Separation of Church and State, Consent of the Governed, Self-Determination, Equal and Just Laws Serving the Common Good. The tenets of civil government that arose from the principles and ideals of the Mayflower Pilgrims and the Indians they lived amongst.

The Origin Story of America begins with a compact, a peace treaty and an inter-cultural feast, followed by a melding of cultures through 50 years of friendship between the Mayflower Pilgrims and the Pokanoket Wampanoag Indians at Plymouth Plantation 1621-1675.

Join Bailey and Marlow as they bring to light the untold story that has been shrouded in the mis-conception and mis-understanding of revisionist history.

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Thanksgiving: A Time to Celebrate and a Time to Mourn

Despite all the confusion and misinformation, there is good news about the 1621 harvest celebration now known as The First Thanksgiving. We Americans have much to celebrate: democracy, separation of church and state, consent of the governed, self-determination, equal and just laws serving the common good. These are the tenets of civil government that arose from the principles and ideals of the Mayflower Pilgrims and the Indians they lived amongst in peace and friendship for 54 years.

We can mourn the loss of potential of the relationship that developed there under the guidance of the two visionary leaders Pilgrim Governor William Bradford and the Massasoit, sachem of the Pokanoket Wampanoags. And we can mourn alongside our Native brothers and sisters who have suffered since that unique time in human history.

The origin story of the United States begins with the Mayflower Compact, the Pilgrim/Wampanoag Peace Treaty and an inter-cultural feast, followed by a melding of cultures through more than half a century of friendship between the Mayflower Pilgrims and the Pokanoket Wampanoags at Plymouth Plantation from 1621 to 1675.

American democracy and the American mind and spirit are the fruits of the seeds planted at Plymouth. There’s an untold story waiting to be told, a story that has been out-of-balance since it the first telling of it. The telling of this story reflects the consciousness of the people who tell it. For centuries we glorified the Pilgrim and ignored the Indian except for the story of Squanto and the planting of corn that culminated in “The First Thanksgiving.” Now, for decades, in an effort to correct that imbalance, revisionist history has demonized the Pilgrims with tales of misdeeds that never occurred. We now have a confused and confusing story. We are enmeshed in blame, shame, guilt and anger, with no one knowing what or who to believe.

mayflowercompact crppd

Signing of The Mayflower Compact. November 11, 1620 aboard the Mayflower.

cropped-pilgrims-treaty-1621-granger1.jpg

Mayflower PIlgrim/Wampanoag Peace Treaty Drafted March 22, 1621

FirstThanksgiving4x6200crppd

Stylized rendition of the harvest celebration of the fall of 1621 now known as The First Thanksgiving.

Here’s a link to an interview on WZBC radio in Boston where we discuss our discoveries around The First Fifty Years of Peace and Friendship at Plymouth Plantation: http://bit.ly/ExpandingAwarenessFirstThxFactorFictionYT

Bringing America’s Origin Story Into Balance

Pilgrims and Indians 16X9 copy

Hello friends! Welcome to the FIRST FIFTY YEARS blog

We have just completed our initial Indiegogo crowd-funding campaign for our challenging film/book project. CLICK HERE to see the details of the campaign: THE FIRST FIFTY YEARS: Freedom and Friendship at Plymouth Plantation.

We are grateful to the 45 people who contributed over $10,000 to upgrade our video equipment to high-definition broadcast quality production capability!

Our fund-raising is on-going, so please feel free to donate any amount, any time, so we can get to the East Coast in the spring, finish our decade-long research, create the documentary film, and write the screenplay and the book!

INSPIRE AMERICA! DONATE NOW!images-1

A Call For Healing

There is a deep wound in the heart of America. Every Thanksgiving there is a blast of misinformation on the Internet and elsewhere which paints a horrific, false picture of the Mayflower Pilgrims and their alleged behavior toward the Indians they lived among. Millions of people now believe these historical absurdities. It’s in our education system. Celebrities like Van Jones and Cher are spreading the blame, shame, guilt and anger. It’s a mess!

Setting The Record Straight

How can we heal this core wound in the American psyche? There’s only one way – tell the truth.  The truth will set us free. The inspiring, uplifting fact is, the Pilgrims and the Indians lived in unbroken peace and friendship for over fifty years. The Pilgrims and the Pokanokets enacted a treaty the day they first met, on March 22, 1621, and they honored the agreement for the next 55 years.

THE FIRST FIFTY YEARS is a film/book /documentary project that will bring a balanced, inspiring and historically accurate perspective to America’s true origin story. It will eliminate the current mis-beliefs and bring much-deserved honor to both the Pilgrims and the Indians.

Andrew Cameron Bailey and Connie Baxter Marlow

Andrew Cameron Bailey & Connie Baxter Marlow Filmmakers

Why Is This So Important?

The Pilgrims carried the first seeds of western democracy to the New World, the beginnings of the momentous move from monarchy to freedom. The result of the settler/Indian interaction was the emergence of a uniquely American mindset based upon basic, universal truths that are humanity’s birthright – freedom of conscience, freedom of the individual, freedom of religion. These ideas came from both the English settlers AND the Indians among whom they lived. The Mayflower Compact, crafted and signed in the cabin of the Mayflower on November 11, 1620 before the Pilgrims set foot on American soil, together with the Great Law of the Iroquois, inspired and ignited the vision of democracy that became the United States of America.

Please join the team – contribute as much as you can, share this blog post, Follow us on Twitter, Like us on Facebook – we’ll keep you informed and updated as this important project unfolds.

We welcome all historically-accurate contributions to the information and ideas presented here. Please post in the comment field below.

“THE FIRST FIFTY YEARS: Freedom and Friendship at Plymouth Colony”
WATCH: www.YouTube.com/First50Yrs
LIKE:www.Facebook.com/First50Yrs
FOLLOW: www.Twitter.com/First50Yrs
CONTRIBUTE: http://bit.ly/FFYDonatePayPal
E-MAIL: First50Yrs@gmail.com

Posted by Connie Baxter Marlow and Andrew Cameron Bailey
Co-authors of THE TRUST FREQUENCY: Ten Assumptions For A New Paradigm
Creators of IN SEARCH OF THE FUTURE: What Do The Wise Ones Know?

Mayflower Pilgrims – Rebels with a Cause

The Pilgrims drafted "The Mayflower Compact" combining themselves into a "civil body politic to enact equal and just laws to serve the common good" in the cabin of the Mayflower before landing.

The Pilgrims drafted “The Mayflower Compact” combining themselves into a “civil body politic to enact equal and just laws to serve the common good” in the cabin of the Mayflower before landing – a giant step forward from monarchy to democracy – American-style.

Freedom of speech, freedom of conscience, separation of church and state – these are principles that drove the Mayflower Pilgrims. These are principles that lie at the foundation of indigenous cosmology. These are guiding principles of the yet-to-be realized American dream that came through the Pilgrims and the Indians they lived amongst.

George F. Willison states in his classic book “Saints and Strangers:”

“The Pilgrims played a vital part – and consciously so – in that great conflict of spiritual and material forces which so decisively shaped the world, as we know it today.  That conflict centered on the fiercely contested right to freedom of conscience, merely one aspect of the still larger right to freedom of thought and speech.  Stripped of theological trimmings, the issue as posed in the Pilgrims’ day was this:

Was it right for the State to demand uniformity of belief?  Or were men entitled to independence of judgment in religious matters?  Should all their beliefs be prescribed, or could they read the Bible for themselves and come to their own conclusions about its teachings?

Far from being humble and soft-spoken, they were quick in their own defense, fond of controversy, and sharp of tongue, engaging in many a high-pitched quarrel with friends and foes alike, even among themselves.”

Read on for more!

Excerpts from Saints and Strangers
George F. Willison
Reynal & Hitchcock, New York 1945    pp. 7-9

“The Pilgrims were not nineteenth century pietists, or quietists.  They were not pale plaster saints, hollow and bloodless.  They were men – and women, too – of courage and conviction, strong and positive in their attitudes, prepared to sacrifice much for their principles, even their very lives.  Far from being Victorians, they were children of another and a greater age, the Elizabethan, and in their lives reflected many of the qualities of that amazing age – its restlessness and impatience with old ways, its passionate enthusiasms, its eager curiosity and daring speculation in all fields, its boldness in action, its abounding and apparently inexhaustible energies.

Never did the Pilgrims quietly resign themselves to defeat, no matter what the odds against them. They launched themselves upon the most hazardous of ventures not once but many times, and no obstacle or untoward circumstance could stay them or divert them from their course.  Far from being humble and soft-spoken, they were quick in their own defense, fond of controversy, and sharp of tongue, engaging in many a high-pitched quarrel with friends and foes alike, even among themselves.  Given to speaking their minds plainly, they expressed themselves in the language of Marlowe and Shakespeare, in the torrential and often rafter-shaking rhetoric of Elizabethan England, with no slightest regard for the proprieties and polite circumlocutions of a later day.  In denouncing the “whore at Rome” they meant just that.

Pilgrims were Elizabethan, too, in their acceptance of the simpler joys of life.  The practiced no macerations of the flesh, no tortures of self-denial.  They appreciated the pleasures of the table and of the bottle, liked both “strong waters” and beer, especially the latter, never complaining more loudly of their hardships than when necessity reduced them to drinking water, which they always regarded with suspicion as a prolific source of human ills.  They were not monks or nuns in their intimate relations as their usually numerous families and more than occasional irregularities attest. Fond of the comforts of connubial bed and board, they married early and often and late, sometimes within a few weeks of losing a mate.  Only on the Sabbath did they go about in funereal blacks and grays.  Ordinarily they wore the russet browns and Lincoln green common among the English lower classes from which they sprang.

The Pilgrims played a vital part – and consciously so – in that great conflict of spiritual and material forces which so decisively shaped the world as we know it today.  That conflict centered on the fiercely-contested right to freedom of conscience, merely one aspect of the still larger right to freedom of thought and speech. Stripped of theological trimmings, the issue as posed in the Pilgrims’ day was this:

Was it right for the State to demand uniformity of belief?  Or were men entitled to independence of judgment in religious matters?  Should all their beliefs be prescribed, or could they read the Bible for themselves and come to their own conclusions about its teachings?

In short, was the “true” church a democratic or an autocratic institution?

Men did not go unflinching to the stake or gallows – the Pilgrims did not willfully choose exile and years of almost incredible hardship – Cromwell and his Independents did not lightly court death as rebels-merely for words. They were valiantly engaged, all of them, in a desperate struggle for a better order of things, for a more generous measure of freedom for all men, for a higher and nobler conception of life based upon recognition of the intrinsic worth and dignity of the individual.  To understand the Pilgrims and the heroic part they played in that epic struggle, it is necessary to go back with Bradford – and even beyond him – to ‘begine at ye very roote & rise of the same.’ “

“THE FIRST FIFTY YEARS: Freedom and Friendship at Plymouth Colony”
WATCH: www.YouTube.com/First50Yrs
LIKE:www.Facebook.com/First50Yrs
FOLLOW: www.Twitter.com/First50Yrs
CONTRIBUTE: http://bit.ly/FFYDonatePayPal
E-MAIL: First50Yrs@gmail.com

Posted by Connie Baxter Marlow and Andrew Cameron Bailey

Co-authors of THE TRUST FREQUENCY: Ten Assumptions For A New Paradigm. Creators of IN SEARCH OF THE FUTURE: What Do The Wise Ones Know?

INSPIRE AMERICA! DONATE NOW!
images-1

Contribute to Healing America’s Core Wound

“THE FIRST FIFTY YEARS: Freedom and Friendship at Plymouth Plantation.” A Cameron/Baxter Films project. There’s still time to contribute to our Indiegogo crowd-funding campaign for our challenging new documentary film/book venture. Funding ends on January 19. Please follow this blog for information that will give you a new perspective on an old story that has been out of balance since we first started telling it. See our other links below for Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.
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